Ex-Tesla employee casts doubt on car safety::A whistleblower believes the self-driving vehicle technology is not safe enough for public roads.

  • @captainastronaut@seattlelunarsociety.org
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    107 months ago

    Duh, of course it’s not. Even the systems with Lidar and Radar are running into pedestrians. Tesla relies entirely on cameras that can’t see through fog or glare. It works only in ideal conditions and situations, and fails very quickly in all the situations a car would encounter in the real world. 

  • @pixelscience@sh.itjust.works
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    57 months ago

    Totally agree, I don’t trust the software currently or the people that are driving around on autopilot while scrolling through tiktok on their phones.

    • @gravitas_deficiency@sh.itjust.works
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      37 months ago

      Well you also shouldn’t trust the hardware because they fucking removed the LiDAR because Elon thought it was “too expensive” for a car that regularly sells well into six figures.

  • AutoTL;DRB
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    27 months ago

    This is the best summary I could come up with:


    Lukasz Krupski leaked data, including customer complaints about Tesla’s braking and self-driving software, to German newspaper Handelsblatt in May.

    But, in his first UK interview, Mr Krupski told the BBC’s technology editor, Zoe Kleinman, he was concerned about how AI was being used - to power Tesla’s autopilot service.

    Mr Krupski said he had found evidence in company data which suggested that requirements relating to the safe operation of vehicles that had a certain level of autonomous or assistive-driving technology had not been followed.

    Tesla has also faced similar probes and questions from agencies including the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration about its autopilot system.

    Jack Stilgoe, an associate professor at University College London who researches autonomous vehicles, said Mr Krupski’s claims raised wider concerns about the technology.

    The UK Government announced plans for an Automated Vehicles Bill to outline a legal framework for self-driving cars in the King’s Speech in early November.


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